Monthly Archives: September 2017

The shifting landscape from imperial to postwar East Asia: War Crimes, Trials, and the Geography of Power

Date: 21-25 September 2017

From 21 September to 25 September, 2017 Dr. Barak Kushner (University of Cambridge) hosted Dr. Chang Chihyun (Shanghai Jiaotong University), Professor Kishi Toshihiko (Kyoto University), and GIS specialist He Jiawei from Feng Chia University (Taiwan), along with graduate students from Shanghai Jiaotong University, Leeds and Bristol Universities. Over several days the group cooperated in the building of a website to geographically analyze the shifting landscape of power from imperial to postwar East Asia. The goal was to plot the location and time of Japanese war crimes and create a database that can be used to lay out a visual geographical map of both the violence during the war and how justice was pursued by trials in the aftermath. The event was held at at the University of Cambridge and funded by a Cambridge Humanities Research Grant.

Workshop Agenda

Summary of Workshop (Chinese)

 


The Reality of Postwar Revolution: A View of the Tokyo Preventive Detention Center and Asian Marxism

Date: 20 September 2017

How did the leadership of the Japanese Communist Party, which had been ruthlessly oppressed since the late-1920s, emerge suddenly after defeat in 1945 to become one of the most organized and powerful political groups in post-imperial Japan? In a guest seminar, Professor Suzuki Norio of Aichi University presented his latest research on the postwar Japan Communist Party and the idea of postwar revolution. Suzuki began with a discussion of the state of archival material on the Japan Communist Party, as well as ongoing efforts of Japanese historians to document party activities during the early-Cold War. In particular, Suzuki’s presentation broke new historical ground by focusing on the hitherto neglected role of the Tokyo Preventive Detention Center as the wartime crucible of the banned Communist Party, from where party leaders and affiliated members debated the shape of the postwar world, the future role of the emperor system, as well as objective conditions for revolution in Japan and East Asia. Through the lives of postwar Japanese Communist Party leaders, such as Tokuda Kyuichi, Nosaka Sanzo, and Ito Ritsu, this presentation revealed the way individual lives and political careers rose and fell with shifts in political and ideological alignments between Moscow and Peking. Bringing together the strands of the wartime and postwar Japanese Communist Party, Suzuki provided a powerful demonstration of the need to see late-imperial and postwar Japanese political history as international history. (The talk and discussion were held in Japanese).

Workshop Poster